Experimental and kinetic study of burning characteristics of natural gas blends

  • Farha Khan

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis

Abstract

Following stringent mandates from environmental regulatory authorities worldwide, various steps are being implemented to ensure clean combustion with minimum emissions, including fuel dilution, mild combustion and additives. Due to the need to understand combustion characteristics in primary applications (engines and turbines) with minimum emissions, the laminar burning velocity of natural gas has been measured with CO2 dilution and a wide range of blends with higher hydrocarbons. And because it has improved anti-knock quality to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), the demand for oxygenated gasoline is now worldwide, making a compelling case for determining combustion behavior of oxygenated gasoline doped with hydrogen, ozone and carbon monoxide. The first section of this dissertation discusses dilution of methane with CO2 at elevated pressures, providing insight into comparative laminar burning characteristics in a wide range of equivalence ratios, particularly significant at elevated initial pressure. Utilizing CHEMKIN, a detailed kinetic study has been performed that explains the varying dependence on dilution ratio controlled by initial pressure. The second phase of this work reports the laminar burning velocity measurement of commercial gasoline. A TPRFE surrogate was used here to investigate burning characteristics and to provide detailed kinetic analysis of gasoline doped with additives (hydrogen, carbon monoxide and ozone). A study was also made of the behavior of gasoline with these additives in practical applications like engine and turbines. For this purpose, laminar burning velocity was measured at elevated pressures and temperatures, by varying the concentrations of synthetic EGR, and followed by measuring turbulent burning velocity at two turbulent intensities.
Date of AwardJul 2021
Original languageEnglish (US)
Awarding Institution
  • Physical Science and Engineering
SupervisorWilliam Roberts (Supervisor)

Keywords

  • laminar flame speed
  • natural gas
  • laminar flames
  • gasoline combustion
  • dilution
  • constant volume spherical vessel

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