Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

Nian Liu, Liangbing Hu, Matthew T. McDowell, Ariel Jackson, Yi Cui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

473 Scopus citations

Abstract

Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for the next-generation high-energy lithium ion battery (LIB), while sulfur and some other lithium-free materials have recently shown high promise as cathode materials. To make a full battery out of them, either the cathode or the anode needs to be prelithiated. Here, we present a method for prelithiating a silicon nanowire (SiNW) anode by a facile self-discharge mechanism. Through a time dependence study, we found that 20 min of prelithiation loads ∼50% of the full capacity into the SiNWs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the nanostructure of SiNWs is maintained after prelithiation. We constructed a full battery using our prelithiated SiNW anode with a sulfur cathode. Our work provides a protocol for pairing lithium-free electrodes to make the next-generation high-energy LIB. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6487-6493
Number of pages7
JournalACS Nano
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

KAUST Repository Item: Exported on 2020-10-01
Acknowledged KAUST grant number(s): KUS-I1-001-12
Acknowledgements: This work was partially supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379, under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BAIT) Program. Y.C. acknowledges support from the ONR Young Investigator Award and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (No. KUS-I1-001-12). M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. A.J. acknowledges support from the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship,
This publication acknowledges KAUST support, but has no KAUST affiliated authors.

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