Engineering a High-Voltage Durable Cathode/Electrolyte Interface for All-Solid-State Lithium Metal Batteries via in Situ Electropolymerization

Qi Li, Xiaoyu Zhang, Jian Peng, Zhihao Wang, Zhixiang Rao, Yuyu Li, Zhen Li, Chun Fang, Jiantao Han, Yunhui Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes have been widely studied as a result of their flexibility, excellent interface contact, and high compatibility with a lithium metal anode. Owing to the poor oxidation resistance of ethers, however, the PEO-based electrolytes are only compatible with low-voltage cathodes, which limits their energy density. Here, a high-voltage stable solid-state interface layer based on polyfluoroalkyl acrylate was constructed via in situ solvent-free bulk electropolymerization between the LiNi0.8Mn0.1Co0.1O2 (NCM811) cathode and the PEO-based solid polymer electrolyte. The electrochemical oxidation window of the as-synthesized electrolyte was therefore expanded from 4.3 V for the PEO-based matrix electrolyte to 5.1 V, and the ionic conductivity was improved to 1.02 × 10-4 S cm-1 at ambient temperature and 4.72 × 10-4 S cm-1 at 60 °C as a result of the improved Li+ migration. This fabrication process for the interface buffer layer by an in situ electrochemical process provides an innovative and universal interface engineering strategy for high-performance and high-energy-density solid-state batteries, which has not been explicitly discussed before, paving the way toward the large-scale production of the next generation of solid-state lithium batteries.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Generated from Scopus record by KAUST IRTS on 2023-09-20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

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