Drop spreading and penetration into pre-wetted powders

Jeremy Marston, James E. Sprittles, Y. Zhu, Erqiang Li, Ivan Uriev Vakarelski, Sigurdur T Thoroddsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present results from an experimental study of the impact of liquid drops onto powder beds which are pre-wetted with the impacting liquid. Using high-speed video imaging, we study both the dynamics of the initial spreading regime and drainage times once the drop has reached its maximum spread on the surface. During the initial spreading stage, we compare our experimental data to a previously developed model which incorporates imbibition into the spreading dynamics and observe reasonable agreement. We find that the maximum spread is a strong function of the moisture content in the powder bed and that the total time from impact to complete drainage is always shorter than that for dry powder. Our results indicate that there is an optimum moisture content (or saturation) which leads to the fastest penetration. We use simple scaling arguments which also identify an optimum moisture content for fastest penetration, which agrees very well with the experimental result. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-136
Number of pages9
JournalPowder Technology
Volume239
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Bibliographical note

KAUST Repository Item: Exported on 2020-10-01
Acknowledged KAUST grant number(s): KUK-C1-013-04, 7000000028
Acknowledgements: This publication is based on work supported by Award No. KUK-C1-013-04, made by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and by an Academic Excellence Alliance grant No. 7000000028 awarded by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds. We thank the anonymous referees for helpful comments and suggestions that greatly improved this paper.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemical Engineering

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