Diversity of archaea and niche preferences among putative ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaeria dominating across European arable soils

Aurélien Saghaï, Samiran Banjeree, Florine Degrune, Anna Edlinger, Pablo García-Palacios, Gina Garland, Marcel G.A. van der Heijden, Chantal Herzog, Fernando T. Maestre, David S. Pescador, Laurent Philippot, Matthias C. Rillig, Sana Romdhane, Sara Hallin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Archaeal communities in arable soils are dominated by Nitrososphaeria, a class within Thaumarchaeota comprising all known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). AOA are key players in the nitrogen cycle and defining their niche specialization can help predicting effects of environmental change on these communities. However, hierarchical effects of environmental filters on AOA and the delineation of niche preferences of nitrososphaerial lineages remain poorly understood. We used phylogenetic information at fine scale and machine learning approaches to identify climatic, edaphic and geomorphological drivers of Nitrososphaeria and other archaea along a 3000 km European gradient. Only limited insights into the ecology of the low-abundant archaeal classes could be inferred, but our analyses underlined the multifactorial nature of niche differentiation within Nitrososphaeria. Mean annual temperature, C:N ratio and pH were the best predictors of their diversity, evenness and distribution. Thresholds in the predictions could be defined for C:N ratio and cation exchange capacity. Furthermore, multiple, independent and recent specializations to soil pH were detected in the Nitrososphaeria phylogeny. The coexistence of widespread ecophysiological differences between closely related soil Nitrososphaeria highlights that their ecology is best studied at fine phylogenetic scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-356
Number of pages16
JournalEnvironmental microbiology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diversity of archaea and niche preferences among putative ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaeria dominating across European arable soils'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this