Cubic-phase zirconia nano-island growth using atomic layer deposition and application in low-power charge-trapping nonvolatile-memory devices

Nazek El-Atab*, Turkan Gamze Ulusoy, Amir Ghobadi, Junkyo Suh, Raisul Islam, Ali K. Okyay, Krishna Saraswat, Ammar Nayfeh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The manipulation of matter at the nanoscale enables the generation of properties in a material that would otherwise be challenging or impossible to realize in the bulk state. Here, we demonstrate growth of zirconia nano-islands using atomic layer deposition on different substrate terminations. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman measurements indicate that the nano-islands consist of nano-crystallites of the cubic-crystalline phase, which results in a higher dielectric constant (κ ∼ 35) than the amorphous phase case (κ ∼ 20). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that a deep quantum well is formed in the Al2O3/ZrO2/Al2O3 system, which is substantially different to that in the bulk state of zirconia and is more favorable for memory application. Finally, a memory device with a ZrO2 nano-island charge-trapping layer is fabricated, and a wide memory window of 4.5 V is obtained at a low programming voltage of 5 V due to the large dielectric constant of the islands in addition to excellent endurance and retention characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number445201
JournalNanotechnology
Volume28
Issue number44
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 5 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Keywords

  • atomic layer deposition
  • memory devices
  • zirconia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • General Chemistry
  • General Materials Science
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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