Corrigendum to “Golden carbon of Sargassum forests revealed as an opportunity for climate change mitigation” [Sci. Total Environ., 729 (2020) Start page – End page/ 138745] (Science of the Total Environment (2020) 729, (S0048969720322622), (10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.138745))

Lidiane P. Gouvêa*, Jorge Assis, Carlos F.D. Gurgel, Ester A. Serrão, Thiago C.L. Silveira, Rui Santos, Carlos M. Duarte, Leticia M.C. Peres, Vanessa F. Carvalho, Manuela Batista, Eduardo Bastos, Marina N. Sissini, Paulo A. Horta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

The authors regret that the printed version of the above article contained errors. These errors in no way affect the analyses performed in this manuscript, the reported results, or the draw conclusions. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused. The requested change does not affect the measures, because all estimation was based on raw values, without conversion to Gg km−2. The correct and final version follows. Page 3: The final value was obtained according to the equation below: Carbon stock in above−ground biomass (Gg km−2): % C X AGB X area (obtained in the Boosted Regression Trees−BRT Model) Changes to: Carbon stock in above−ground biomass (Pg C): % C (dry weight) X AGB (dry weight) X area (obtained in the Boosted Regression Trees−BRT Model) * Biomass dry weight corresponds to 10% of wet weight. Page 4, first paragraph of Results: “…and a potential standing stock 82.58 Gg km−2 of floating Sargassum in the Atlantic Ocean. At the global scale, models estimated 305.95 and 139.59·104 km2 of floating and benthic Sargassum, respectively (445.54·104km2 in total), and overall biomass of 84.05 Gg km−2, which corresponds to 13.1 Pg C globally (Fig. 1b)”. Changes to: “…and a potential standing stock 8.25 Gg km−2 of floating Sargassum in the Atlantic Ocean. At the global scale, models estimated 305.95 and 139.59·104 km2 of floating and benthic Sargassum, respectively (445.54·104km2 in total), and overall biomass of 8.40 Gg km−2, which corresponds to 13.1 Pg C globally (Fig. 1b)”. Page 4, first paragraph of Discussion: “These floating Sargassum estimates are increased up to 25.2·103 Gg when considering the potential global distribution of the genus (Fig. 1b)”. Changes to: “These floating Sargassum estimates are increased up to 25,241·103 Gg when considering the potential global distribution of the genus (Fig. 1b)”. Changes in Fig. 1b: Fig. 1b Corrections of values in Above ground biomass of 82.58 Gg km−2, 1.47 Gg km−2 and 84.05 Gg km−2. Also, the values of mangrove, salt marsh and seagrasses were converted to Gg km−2. Changes to: 8.25 Gg km−2, 0.14 Gg km−2 and 8.40 Gg km−2. [Figure presented] We include a reference in the Fig. 1 legend: Castillo, J. M., Rubio-Casal, A. E., Figueroa, E. 2010. Cordgrass biomass in coastal marshes. Biomass, 1–26. Table S4 (Supplementary material): Note: The table S4 includes biomass data (wet weight) at peak events (Sissini et al., 2017 and this study) Correction of value: 14000 g.m-2 instead of 140000 g.m-2 We included three references in Table S4: Stoner, A. W. 1983. Pelagic Sargassum: Evidence for a major decrease in biomass. Deep Sea Research Part A. Oceanographic Research Papers, 30(4), 469-474. Butler, J. N., Morris, B. F., Sass, J. 1973. Pelagic Tar from Bermuda and the Sargasso Sea (No. BBS-10). Bermuda Biological Station for Research St George's West. Schell, J. M., Goodwin, D. S., Siuda, A. N. 2015. Recent Sargassum inundation events in the Caribbean: shipboard observations reveal dominance of a previously rare form. Oceanography, 28(3), 8-11.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number144696
JournalScience of The Total Environment
Volume765
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

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