Calculation and analysis of the mobility and diffusion coefficient of thermal electrons in methane/air premixed flames

Fabrizio Bisetti, Mbark El Morsli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Simulations of ion and electron transport in flames routinely adopt plasma fluid models, which require transport coefficients to compute the mass flux of charged species. In this work, the mobility and diffusion coefficient of thermal electrons in atmospheric premixed methane/air flames are calculated and analyzed. The electron mobility is highest in the unburnt region, decreasing more than threefold across the flame due to mixture composition effects related to the presence of water vapor. Mobility is found to be largely independent of equivalence ratio and approximately equal to 0.4m 2V -1s -1 in the reaction zone and burnt region. The methodology and results presented enable accurate and computationally inexpensive calculations of transport properties of thermal electrons for use in numerical simulations of charged species transport in flames. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3518-3521
Number of pages4
JournalCombustion and Flame
Volume159
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Bibliographical note

KAUST Repository Item: Exported on 2020-10-01
Acknowledgements: This work was supported by two Academic Excellence Alliance (AEA) Grants awarded by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under the titles "Electromagnetically-enhanced combustion" and "Tracking uncertainty in computational modeling of reactive systems". The authors would like to thank the two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • General Physics and Astronomy
  • General Chemical Engineering
  • General Chemistry
  • Fuel Technology

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