Age and gender specific pediatric reference intervals for aldolase, amylase, ceruloplasmin, creatine kinase, pancreatic amylase, prealbumin, and uric acid

Sarah M. Clifford, Ashley M. Bunker, Jeffrey R. Jacobsen, William L. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Reference intervals can vary based on age and gender. Proper partitioning is necessary to classify health status in different age groups. Methods: Seven analytes; aldolase, amylase, ceruloplasmin, creatine kinase, pancreatic amylase, prealbumin and uric acid; were assayed on Roche Modular P analyzers using serum samples from 1765 children (867 females and 898 males; age range, 6. months to 17. y). Subjects 6. months up to 7. y were undergoing minor surgical procedures. Children 7 to 17. y were apparently healthy. Subjects with significant medical history or who were taking any medications were excluded. Results: Separate reference intervals for boys and girls were required for 33% of the groups. Aldolase showed gender variation in the 6-8, 12-14, and 15-17. y. Amylase was the only analyte that showed no significant gender differences within any age group. Both ceruloplasmin and uric acid had significant differences between the 12-14 and 15-17. y groups. Creatine kinase exhibited statistically significant gender differences in all age groups with the exception of 6-8. y. Conclusion: We verified that when establishing pediatric reference intervals, partitioning by age and gender is frequently necessary. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)788-790
Number of pages3
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume412
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2011
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Generated from Scopus record by KAUST IRTS on 2023-09-20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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